News

When a group of alumni from the School of Nursing gathered in the fall of 2019, their goal was to establish a formal association that would support nurses long after they left Rutgers–Camden.

Their timing, it turned out, couldn’t have been better.

As the School of Nursing-Camden Alumni Association was being chartered in 2020—coincidentally the Year of the Nurse and Midwife—the world was in the throes of the COVID-19 pandemic, and nurses were on the front lines.

Health equity for underserved Latino and immigrant populations will be broadened at the Rutgers School of Nursing–Camden, thanks to a generous grant from the U.S. Department of Education’s International and Foreign Language office to strengthen Spanish language skills among students and faculty.

Marie O'Toole

Simply put, explains Marie O’Toole, being a nurse means being able to make a tangible difference in peoples’ lives, whether it is bedside in a hospital or a home, or within a larger context, such as a population or community.

Historically, nurses have addressed underserved communities that lack access to quality health care, partnering with service providers across disciplines and the community to promote well-being to vulnerable people. Rutgers School of Nursing–Camden students took part in this storied tradition and gained vital hands-on experience by delivering health education and screenings to local parishioners, neighbors, and homeless people at a health fair hosted by the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Camden, N.J. on November 13, 2016.

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