News

June 4, 2020

Dear Faculty, Staff, Students, Alumni, and Friends of the Rutgers School of Nursing–Camden,

The Rutgers School of Nursing–Camden community condemns the violence against African Americans that most recently ended the lives of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor.

We are confronted by racism and discrimination in our clinical practice sites, our classrooms, our research settings, the policy realm, and our daily lives. We find ourselves witness to our colleagues and students who experience systemic institutionalized racism and discrimination.

Marie O'Toole

Simply put, explains Marie O’Toole, being a nurse means being able to make a tangible difference in peoples’ lives, whether it is bedside in a hospital or a home, or within a larger context, such as a population or community.

Historically, nurses have addressed underserved communities that lack access to quality health care, partnering with service providers across disciplines and the community to promote well-being to vulnerable people. Rutgers School of Nursing–Camden students took part in this storied tradition and gained vital hands-on experience by delivering health education and screenings to local parishioners, neighbors, and homeless people at a health fair hosted by the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Camden, N.J. on November 13, 2016.

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